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Alexandru Niculescu - EMBA 2008
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Model GMAT

Acest test cuprinde 33 intrebari tip GMAT, durata recomandata pentru rezolvarea lui este de o ora. Te rugam sa notezi raspunsurile si pe o foaie separata inainte de a apasa butonul Trimite.

Sample Questions

 

The sample questions that follow will familiarize you with the types of questions in the test. Although the sample questions represent the general nature of the test, it is possible that a type of question not illustrated may appear in the test or that material illustrated may not appear. Directions are similar to those in the test.

 

All GMAT test books contain nine separately timed sections, but all examinees at an administration do not necessarily receive the same test book. Of the nine sections, seven are 25- minute sections comprised of multiple-choice questions and two sections are 30-minute writing tasks. For any particular test book, one of the seven multiple-choice sections contains trial questions needed for pre-testing and equating, but they are not identified and appear in varying locations within the test. You should therefore do your best on all sections. Answers to the trial questions are not counted in the scoring of your test.

 

The quantitative sections of the GMAT measure basic mathematical skills and understanding of elementary concepts, and the ability to reason quantitatively, solve quantitative problems, and interpret graphic data.

 

The verbal sections of the test measure the ability to understand and evaluate what is read and to recognize basic conventions of standard written English.

The analytical writing sections of the test measure the ability to think critically and communicate complex ideas through writing.

 

Individual test questions and the test as a whole are reviewed to eliminate language, symbols, or content considered to be potentially offensive or inappropriate for major subgroups of the test-taking population or that serve to perpetuate any negative attitude about these subgroups. In addition, statistical procedures are applied to help identify questions that may be unfair.

 

International students should note that GMAT is entirely in English and that all instructions read aloud by test supervisors are in English. There are no foreign language editions of the test.

 

Each multiple-choice question is followed by five lettered choices from which you are asked to choose the one you think best. After you complete the sample questions, check your answers against the key on page 12.

 

You may use the practice answer sheet that follows to mark your answers to the multiple-choice questions that follow. The answer sheets for the analytical writing sections allow for writing in pencil on three sides of letter-sized (8½-by-11-inch) paper.

 

Reading Comprehension

 

Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question and fill in the corresponding oval on the answer sheet. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage.

 

One sample reading passage follows.

 

SAMPLE PASSAGE

 

Studies of the Weddell seal in the laboratory have described the physiological mechanisms that allow the seal to cope with the extreme oxygen deprivation that occurs during its longest dives, which can extend 500 meters below the ocean’s surface and last for over 70 minutes. Recent field studies, however, suggest that during more typical dives in the wild, this seal’s physiological behavior is different.

 

In the laboratory, when the seal dives below the surface of the water, and stops breathing, its heart beats more slowly, requiring less oxygen, and its arteries become constricted, ensuring that the seal’s blood remains concentrated near those organs most crucial to its ability to navigate underwater. The seal essentially shuts off the flow of blood, which either stop functioning until the seal surfaces or switch to an anaerobic (oxygen-independent) metabolism. The latter results in the production of large amounts of lactic acid which can adversely affect the pH of the seal’s blood, but since the anaerobic metabolism occurs only in those tissues which have been isolated from the seal’s blood supply, the lactic acid is released into the seal’s blood only after the seal surfaces, when the lungs, liver, and other organs quickly clear the acid from the seal’s bloodstream.

 

Recent field studies, however, reveal that on dives in the wild, the seal usually heads directly for its prey and returns to the surface in less than twenty minutes. The absence of high levels of lactic acid in the seal’s blood after such dives suggests that during them, the seal’s organs do not resort to the anaerobic metabolism observed in the laboratory, but are supplied with oxygen from the blood. The seal’s longer excursions underwater, during which it appears to be either exploring distant routes or evading a predator, do evoke the diving response seen in the laboratory. But why do the seal’s laboratory dives always evoke this response, regardless of their lengths or depths? Some biologists speculate that because in laboratory dives the seal is forcibly submerged, it does not know how long it will remain underwater and so prepares for the worst.

1.

The passage provides information to support which of the following generalizations?

1. The physiological behavior of animals in a laboratory setting is not always consistent with their physiological behavior in the wild.

2. The level of lactic acid in an animal’s blood is likely to be lowest during those periods in which it experiences oxygen deprivation.

3. The level of lactic acid in an animal’s blood is likely to be higher when it is searching for prey than when it is evading predators.

4. It is generally less difficult to observe the physiological behavior of an animal in the wild than in the laboratory.

5. Observations of animals’ physiological behavior in the wild are not reliable unless verified by laboratory studies

2.

It can be inferred from the passage that by describing the Weddell seal as preparing ‘for the worst’ (lines 31-32), biologists mean that it

1. clears the lactic acid from its blood before attempting to dive

2. begins to exhibit predatory behavior

3. exhibits physiological behavior similar to that which characterizes its longest dives in the wild

4. exhibits physiological behavior similar to that which characterizes dives in which it heads directly for its prey

5. prepares to remain underwater for no longer than twenty minutes

3.

The passage suggests that during laboratory dives, the pH of the Weddell seal’s blood is not adversely affected by the production of lactic acid because

1. the seal remains submerged for only short periods of time

2. oxygen continues to be supplied to organs that clear lactic acid from the seal’s bloodstream

3. organs that revert to an anaerobic metabolism are temporarily isolated from the seal’s bloodstream

4. the seal typically reverts to an anaerobic metabolism only at the very end of the dive

5. only those organs that are essential to the seal’s ability to navigate underwater revert to an anaerobic mechanism

4.

Which of the following best summarizes the main point of the passage?

1. How the Weddell seal responds to oxygen deprivation during its longest dives appears to depend on whether the seal is searching for prey or avoiding predators during such dives.

2. Biologists speculate that laboratory studies of the physiological behavior of seals during dives lasting more than twenty minutes would be more accurate if the seals were not forcibly submerged.

3. The results of recent field studies have made it necessary for biologists to revise previous perceptions of how the Weddell seal behaves physiologically during its longest dives in the wild.

4. The Weddell seal has developed a number of unique mechanisms that enable it to remain submerged at depths of up to 500 meters for up to 70 minutes.

5. Recent fields studies have indicated that descriptions of the physiological behavior of the Weddell seal during laboratory dives are not applicable in its most typical dives in the wild.

5.

According to the author, which of the following is true of the laboratory studies mentioned in line 1?

1. They provide an accurate account of the physiological behavior of Weddell seals during those dives in the wild in which they are either evading predators or exploring distant routes.

2. They are based on the assumption that Weddell seals rarely spend more than twenty minutes underwater on a typical dive in the wild.

3. They provide evidence that undermines the view that the Weddell seal relies on an anaerobic metabolism during its most typical dives in the wild.

4. They present an oversimplified account of mechanisms that the Weddell seal relies on during its longest dives in the wild.

5. They fail to explain how the seal is able to tolerate the increased production of lactic acid by organs that revert to an anaerobic metabolism during its longest dives in the wild.

6.

The passage suggests that because Weddell seals are forcibly submerged during laboratory dives, they do which of the following?

1. Navigate less effectively than they do on typical dives in the wild.

2. Produce smaller amounts of lactic acid than they do on typical dives in the wild.

3. Cope with oxygen depravation less effectively than they do on typical dives in the wild.

4. Exhibit the physiological responses that are characteristic of the longer dives they undertake in the wild.

5. Exhibit the physiological responses that are characteristic of dives in the wild that last less than twenty minutes.

Critical Reasoning Directions:

For each question in this section, select the best of the answer choices given.

7.

There are fundamentally two possible changes in an economy that will each cause inflation unless other compensating changes also occur. These changes are either reductions in the supply of goods and services or increases in demand. In a prebanking economy the quantity of money available, and hence the level of demand, is equivalent to the quantity of gold available. If the statements above are true, then it is also true that in a prebanking economy

1. whatever changes in demand occur, there will be compensating changes in the supply of goods and services.

2. the quantity of goods and services purchasable by a given amount of gold is constant

3. if there is a reduction in the quantity of gold available, then, other things being equal, inflation must result

4. if other factors in the economy are unchanged, increasing the quantity of gold available will lead to inflation

5. any inflation is the result of reductions in the supply of goods and services

8.

Which of the following best completes the argument below? One effect of the introduction of the electric refrigerator was a collapse in the market for ice. Formerly householders had bought ice to keep their iceboxes cool and the food stored in the iceboxes fresh. Now the iceboxes cool themselves. Similarly, the introduction of crops genetically engineered to be resistant to pests will...

1. reduce the number of farmers keeping livestock.

2. reduce the value of farmland

3. reduce demand for chemical pesticides

4. increase the costs of seeds

5. increase the size of crop harvests

9.

Since 1975 there has been in the United States a dramatic decline in the incidence of traditional childhood diseases such as measles. This decline has been accompanied by an increased incidence of Peterson`s disease, a hitherto rare viral infection, among children. Few adults, however, have been affected by the disease. Which of the following, if true, would best help to explain the increased incidence of Peterson`s disease among children?

1. Those who have contracted Peterson`s disease are at increased risk of contracting chicken pox.

2. (D) Persons who did not contact measles in childhood might contract measles in adulthood, in which case the consequences of the disease would generally be more severe.

3. Children who contact measles develop an immunity to the virus that causes Peterson`s disease.

4. The decrease in traditional childhood diseases and the accompanying increase in Peterson`s disease have not been found in any other country.

5. Hereditary factors determine in part the degree to which a person is susceptible to the virus that causes Peterson`s disease.

Questions 10-11 are based on the following: An annually conducted, nationwide survey shows a continuing marked decline in the use of illegal drugs by high school seniors over the last three years.

10.

Which of the following, if true, casts most doubt on the relevance of the survey results described above for drawing conclusions about illegal drug use in the teen-age population as a whole?

1. The proportion of high school seniors who say that they strongly disapprove of illegal drug use has declined over last three years.

2. Survey participants are more likely now than they were three years ago to describe as “heroic” people who were addicted to illegal drugs and have been able to quit.

3. Illegal drug use by teen-agers is highest in those areas of the country where teen-agers are least likely to stay in high school for their senior year.

4. The decline uncovered in the survey has occurred despite the decreasing cost of illegal drugs.

5. Because of cuts in funding, no survey of illegal drug use by high school seniors will be conducted next year.

11.

Which of the following, if true, would provide most support for concluding from the survey results described above that the use of illegal drugs by people below the age of 20 is declining?

1. The number of those surveyed who admit to having sold illegal drugs has declined even faster than has the number who have used drugs.

2. (D) The decline revealed by the surveys is the result of drug education programs specifically targeted at those below the age of 20.

3. The percentage of high school seniors who use illegal drugs is consistently very similar to the percentage of all people below the age of 20 who use illegal drugs.

4. In the past, high school seniors were consistently the population group most likely to use them heavily.

5. Changes in the level of drug use by high school seniors are seldom matched by changes in the level of drug use by other people below the age of 20.

12.

In elections in the United States, the proper role of the press is to cover only those factors in the campaign which bear on the eventual outcome. Since the outcome is invariably a victory for the candidate of one of the two major parties, the press should not cover the campaigns of candidates of minor parties. The argument above relies on which of the following assumptions?

1. Supporters of candidates of minor parties are less likely to be influenced by the press than are the supporters of candidates of the two major parties.

2. The number of votes cast for a candidate of a minor party is not likely to affect the outcome of the contest between the candidates of the two major parties.

3. Many eligible voters do not bother to vote, and of those who do not vote, some would probably have supported a candidate of a minor party.

4. It is unlikely that there will be more than three candidates in any given race.

5. The press has an obligation to cover the candidates of the two major parties because these candidates are likely to be better known to the public than are candidates of minor parties.

Data Sufficiency Directions: Each of the data sufficiency problems below consists of a question and two statements, labeled (1) and (2), in which certain data are given. You have to decide whether the data given in the statements are sufficient for answering the question.

 

Using the data given in the statements plus your knowledge of mathematics and everyday facts (such as the number of days in July or the meaning of counterclockwise), you are to fill in oval A If statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked; B If statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked; C If BOTH statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question asked, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient; D If EACH statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked; E If statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question asked, and additional data specific to the problem are needed. Numbers: All numbers used are real numbers. Figures: A figure in a data sufficiency problem will confirm to the information given in the question, but will not necessarily conform to the additional information given in statements (1) and (2).

 

You may assume that lines shown as straight are straight and that angle measures are greater than zero. You may assume that the positions of points, angles, regions, etc., exist in the order shown. All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.

 

Note: In questions that ask for the value of a quantity, the data given in the statements are sufficient only when it is possible to determine exactly one numerical value for the quantity.

13.

What was the gross income of Corporation C for year X?

1. The gross income of Corporation C for year X represented a 5 percent increase over the gross income for year Y.

2. For year Y, the gross income of Corporation C was $8,300,000.

14.

If x is a positive number, what is the value of x?

1. x² = 4x – 3

2. x- 2 |= 1

15.

During the first year after a homeowner had installed a solar-powered attic fan, the cost of air-conditioning her home was x dollars less than it was the previous year. What was the value of x?

1. During the first year after the fan was installed, the home-owner`s cost of air-conditioning was reduced by 24 percent of the previous year`s cost.

2. The total cost of purchasing and installing the fan was $350.

16.

Are the integers p, q and r consecutive integers?

1. r is 1 greater than q and q is 1 greater than p.

2. The sum of p, q and r is 15.

17.

A wire 22 meters long is cut into three pieces. How long is the longest piece?

1. One piece is 7 meters long.

2. Two pieces are each 1 meter shorter than longest piece.

18.

What is the ratio of the area of circular region A to the area of circular region B?

1. The radius of A is 9 centimeters and the circumference of B is 6п centimeters.

2. The ratio of the circumference of A to the circumference of B is 3 to 1.

19.

If t and r are positive integers and r is a divisor of t, is r a prime number?

1. The smallest divisor of t that is greater than 1 is r.

2. 5r = t

Problem Solving Directions: In this section solve each problem, using any available space on the page for scratchwork. Then indicate the best of the answer choices given.

 

Numbers: All numbers used are real numbers.

 

Figures: Figures that accompany problems in this section are intended to provide information useful in solving the problems. They are drawn as accurately as possible EXCEPT when it is stated in a specific problem that its figure is not drawn to scale. All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.

20.

An earth science class had a 50-minute laboratory period during which 5 minutes were spent in distributing and collecting material and 10 minutes were spent in discussing the project for the day. If the remaining time was spent in work on the project, what percent of the period was devoted to work on the project?

1. 50%

2. 60%

3. 70%

4. 75%

5. 80%

21.

On the number line, what is the number that is ¼ of the distance from 5.1 to 5.3?

1. 5.35

2. 5.25

3. 5.2

4. 5.15

5. 5.125

22.

One-third of the rooms in the Chateau Hotel have a harbor view, and the rate for each of these is 1.2 times the rate for each of the remaining 180 rooms. If the rate for the rooms without a harbor view is d dollars per day, what is the hotel`s maximum income, in dollars, from room rentals for one day?

1. 288d

2. 270d

3. 240d

4. 234d

5. 204d

23.

1/x-x = 3, and x > 0, then x =

1. 5/2

2. 2

3. 3/2

4. 1

5. 1/2

24.

If the volume of cube X is 8 cubic meters, what is its total surface area in square meters?

1. 64

2. 48

3. 24

4. 16

5. 8

25.

If all of the telephone extensions in a certain company must be even numbers, and if each of the extensions uses all four of the digits 1, 2, 3 and 6, what is the greatest number of four-digit extensions that the company can have?

1. 24

2. 16

3. 12

4. 6

5. 4

26.

A car traveled 462 miles per tankful of gasoline on the highway and 336 miles per tankful of gasoline in the city. If the car traveled 6 fewer miles per gallon in the city than on the highway, how many miles per gallon did the car travel in the city?

1. 27

2. 22

3. 21

4. 16

5. 14

Sentence Correction Directions: In each of the following sentences, some part of the sentence or the entire sentence is underlined. Beneath each sentence you will find five ways of phrasing the underlined part. The first of these repeats the original; the other four are different. If you think the original is the best of these answer choices, choose answer A; otherwise, choose one of the others. Select the best version and fill in the corresponding oval on your answer sheet. This is a test of correctness and effectiveness of expression. In choosing answers, follow the requirements of standard written English; that is, pay attention to grammar, choice of words, and sentence construction. Choose the answer that produces the most effective sentence construction; this answer should be clear and exact, without awkwardness, ambiguity, redundancy, or grammatical error.

27.

As farmland has continued to erode, farmers have applied more fertilizer both so that eroded topsoil will be substituted for and fertility should be enhanced.

1. to substitute for eroded topsoil and that fertility might be enhanced

2. so as to substitute for eroded topsoil and fertility will be enhanced

3. that eroded topsoil might be substituted for and fertility enhanced

4. to substitute for eroded topsoil and to enhance fertility

5. so that eroded topsoil will be substituted for and fertility should be enhanced

28.

As researchers continue to probe the highly expressive vocal and postural language of wolves, their close resemblance to dogs has become ever more striking.

1. the close resemblance of wolves with dogs becomes

2. the close resemblance between wolves and dogs becomes

3. the close resemblance between them and dogs has become

4. the closeness of their resemblance to dogs has become

5. their close resemblance to dogs has become

29.

As the British criminologist Radzinowiez maintains, the harsher the penalties formally required by statute, judges and juries are less willing to impose them.

1. the less willing judges and juries are to impose them.

2. the less willing does imposing them by judges and jury become

3. judges and juries become less willing about imposing them

4. imposing them becomes something judges and juries are less willing to do

5. judges and juries are less willing to impose them

30.

Perhaps only among populations that have raised dairy animals for the past 10,000 years or so people retain beyond childhood the ability that they can produce lactase, the enzyme that enables them to digest milk products.

1. do people retain beyond childhood the ability to produce

2. do people retain beyond childhood their ability for producing

3. is the ability of people retained beyond childhood to produce

4. people retain beyond childhood the ability to produce

5. people retain beyond childhood the ability that they can produce

31.

The effect of the earthquake that caused most of Port Royal to sink into the Caribbean was like the eruption that buried ancient Pompeii: in each case a slice of civilization was instantly frozen in time.

1. Most of Port Royal sank into the Caribbean because of an earthquake, the effect of which was

2. The earthquake that caused most of Port Royal to sink into the Caribbean was, in its effects,

3. In its effects, the sinking of most of Port Royal into the Caribbean was the result of an earthquake

4. As the result of an earthquake, most of Port Royal sank into the Caribbean; the effect was

5. The effect of the earthquake that caused most of Port Royal to sink into the Caribbean was

32.

Cleveland that Sarah Short Austen, former vice president of the National Urban Coalition, remembers was a progressive city, the first of its size to elect a Black man, Carl Stokes, as mayor.

1. Cleveland, a city remembered by Sarah Short Austen, once a former vice president of the National Urban Coalition,

2. The Cleveland that Sarah Short Austen, once a former vice president of the National Urban Coalition, has remembered

3. The City of Cleveland that Sarah Short Austen, who has been a former vice president of the National Urban Coalition, remembered

4. The Cleveland that Sarah Short Austen, former vice president of the National Urban Coalition, remembers

5. Cleveland that Sarah Short Austen, former vice president of the National Urban Coalition, remembers

33.

Like John McPhee’s works, Ann Beattie painstakingly assembles in her works an interesting and complete world out of hundreds of tiny details about a seemingly uninteresting subject.

1. Just as John McPhee, Ann Beattie painstakingly assembles in her works

2. Just as John McPhee’s, so Ann Beattie’s works painstakingly assemble

3. Like John McPhee, Ann Beattie painstakingly assembles in her works

4. Like John McPhee, Ann Beattie’s works painstakingly assembles

5. Like John McPhee’s works, Ann Beattie painstakingly assembles in her works

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